Asia/Kathmandu

Nepal’s confusion on same-sex wedded life leaves couples in limbo

In December 2015, four months after the Us Supreme Court legalized same-sex wedding, Suman Pant had married to her friend Leslie Melnyk, an American, in the area of California. The exact same year, in September, Nepal promulgated its new law, which guarded the rights of the LGBTIQ society. Or at least that’s what the couple was informed. But when Suman and Leslie agreed to move to Nepal, they had no idea that things would turn out so different.

“When we shifted to Nepal, we realized there would be a few struggles concerning social acceptance,” states Pant. “But we thought that we were fully guarded by law.”

Pant was misled. Even with being celebrated as one of the very progressive Asian nations when it comes to LGBTIQ rights, political infighting and repeated bureaucratic inertia have intended that same-sex marriage stays in a grey region, where it is not illegal but not legally sanctioned often.

In December 2007, a landmark Supreme Court judgment not just recognized the rights of sexual minorities, but additionally directed the government to make needed arrangements–including producing new laws or amending existing ones–to make sure that people of various gender identities and sexual orientations could enjoy their legal rights without discrimination.

The verdict was an important step in decriminalizing other gender identities and sexual orientations. After years of campaigning and advocacy, transgender individual persons could now get citizenships and passports under the ‘O’, or other, category.

Nevertheless, the Supreme Court refrained from making a final decision on legalizing same-sex married life. The legalization of same-sex marriage was to be suggested by a committee after carrying out an intensive study and analysis of international human rights instruments, global values and methods, and its impact on modern society. 

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